When advertising gets gangsta

21:9 interactive recently leveraged their award winning Philips Carousel short film from Adam Berg and Stink Digital for the new 50 cent video

the street version

the award winner

Melody roads. What’s the difference?

Two ads. Two executions. One idea.

The tactic is called Melody Roads. A phenomenon that started around 2007 in Japan. Basically it’s a one-up of the rumble strip. These thoroughfares use cars, specifically their tires, as tuning forks to play music as they drive along. The musical roads are created by a series of grooves, cut at very specific intervals, in the surface of the asphalt.

Much like the vibrations and rumbles produced on a bumpy or poorly maintained street, engineers discovered that different notes were produced when grooves were placed at certain intervals along the surface.

This was created when it was discovered that 68 percent of highway accidents in Korea caused by inattentive, sleeping or speeding drivers, the Korean Highway Corp., as well as the Hokkaido Industrial Research Institute in Japan, came up with the idea of musical road surfaces to keep motorists entertained but also to reduce their speed and help them stay alert.

I think the use of roads for a gorilla execution is cool, but at the same time, come on. Once someone else does it, don;t think by doing a different song or creating a video or a sign will make it different.

Here is the recent ad for Dunlop tires.

dunlopmelodyroad

And here is the Honda music road

Question. If the ultimate goal or the social twist on it is to keep drivers awake. Then why play nursery rhyme songs that little children listen too when they are trying to sleep?

If we use a “sound cannon” instead of an “audio spotlight”, does that make our idea different?

Picture 45

Picture 3

Above are 2 articles about the same idea for A&E’s Paranormal State. Below, is a video explanation of an idea for the show Supernatural on Scream TV.  I don’t know guys . . . I don’t know.

How many TV shows use blood in their ambient advertisements?

A lot. It’s become completely predictable. Hey! we have a show about a serial killer with a heart. Let’s use blood in a fountain. Hey, we have a TV station that plays a lot horror movies. Let’s use blood in the bathroom. Hey we have a show about murders. Lets put blood in a bathroom. Like come on already. I understand that it is probably the first place your mind goes when trying to figure out how to advertise a horror/murder/crime show. And i am sure that the public always gets a kick out of it. But in an area that probably has a lot of opportunities to do really cool shit why do people always go here. Probably because it’s easy and they want this stunt in their book. Or they reasoned with themselves that this stunt is completely different then the other stunt. ‘Oh look. ours use a public fountain. There’s used a semi-public fountain. completely different’ Step your game up people! Just so we’re clear. i find all of these in like 4 minutes. 4 minutes. i am willing to bet if i took 10 minutes i could find a hundred more.

13THSTREETbloodbath
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amnestycrime-1
cluesoap
bloodfountainonhighland
closeupoftheblood

Chicago Lake Liquors

Odd.  Interesting.  White doods talking like G’s is always funny.  I think they dropped the ball on the back end.  In the print they use the line “The best prices are in the hood” – I wish I saw an iteration of that line in the TV spots.

Hey! what a good idea someone already had

Do your research people!

I have a gut feeling that they knew about the previous one, but were like all ‘nah, ours is print and theirs was a TSA. Plus the copy is kinda different. We’re good. When should i book my ticket for Cannes?’

The copy

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The original?
Contexte_ISSA

Don’t get caught looking at porn at work.

original_sexyclube

Cute idea but I don’t like it.  I know I’ve seen it done before but I can’t remember where or for whom.  Did I use whom correctly?